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> Play On 11-16 23-19

1. Solution to winning 1st Position
2.Solution to winning 2nd Position.
3. Solution to winning 3rd Position.
4. Solution to winning,
or drawing, 4th position.


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To determine "Who
has the move", count
ALL the pieces in YOUR
SYSTEM, when it is YOUR
TURN TO PLAY. If the number is
ODD,you have the move.
If it is even your
opponent has THE MOVE.

Standard Positions




WINNING 1ST POSITION

* White
moves
1. 15-19-A
2. 20-16
3. 16-11
4. 11-7
5. 7-3
6. 3-7
7. 7-10
8. 10-15
9. 15-18
10. 18-23
11. 23-27
12. 19-23
13. 27-32-B
14. 23-18
Red
moves
28-32
32-28
28-32
32-28
28-32
32-28
28-32
32-28
28-32
32-28
28-32
32-28
28-24-B
24-28-C-D
White
moves
15. 18-15
16. 32-28
17. 15-18
18. 28-32
19. 18-15
20. 15-11-G
21. 32-27
22. 27-31
23. 11-15
White wins
Red
moves
28-24-E
24-27-F
12-16
27-24
24-28
16-19
28-32
32-28

AA. White must crown the single piece, then with the 2 kings drive the red king from the double corner-all the while holding the red single piece from crowning.
A. If 12-16 27-24 16-20 24-28. White wins.
BB.
Into the sanctuary.
B. If 12-16 then 32-27 16-20 27-32. White wins.
C. If 12-16 then 18-15 makes same play as in trunk at white's 15th move.
D. 24-19, 32-28, 12-16, 28-32, 16-20, 32-28, 19-16, 18-23, 16-11, 23-19, (changing the guard on the pc. on 20) 11-8, 28-32, 8-12, 32-27, 12-8, 27-23, 8-12, 23-18, 12-8, 18-15. White wins. E. 12-16, 15-11, 16-19, 32-27 same as trunk at white's 21st move.
F. 24-20, 15-11, 12-16, 28-32, 16-19, 11-15, 19-24, 32-28, 24-27, 28-32, 27-31, 15-19, 31-26, 19-24. White wins.
G. At this point, in a $500 stake match with Hugh Henderson, for the American title, Newell Banks, one of the great players of all time, moving fast, played 15-18!, allowing Henderson to draw with 16-19, 32-27, 19-23 (through) Drawn. Even the best can falter.

There are many old friends that could make up a gold dozen. They frequently come up in play from either side of the board-meaning colors reversed.

WINNING 2ND POSITION
Top of page
Rather than try and memorize long solutions, it is best to remember the idea. Here, because the attacker has the move the defending king will have to retreat to the opposite double corner to avoid immediate defeat. White will accomplish the win with these ideas: 1. Crown all pieces.
2. Accomplish No. 1, by "changing the guard" on the single men.
3. Force and exchange-which loses the move!
4. Force another exchange that will regain the move!
5. Trap Red's last king!
Sounds hard. After seeing this, anyone can win 2nd position. Guaranteed! The games 2nd most common ending, here is the solution.
*32-28
25-22
28-24
22-17
24-19
17-22
19-15
22-17
15-18
17-13
18-22
13-9
30-26-A
9-14
26-23
14-9
23-18
9-6
18-14
6-1
14-9
1-5
9-6
5-9
6-2
9-5
2-6
5-1
6-10
1-5
10-15
5-9
15-19
9-14
27-23-B
14-9
23-18
9-6
18-14
6-1
14-9
1-5
9-6
5-9
6-2
9-5
2-6
5-1
6-10
1-5
10-15
5-9
15-18
9-6
18-23
6-10
23-27-C
10-14
19-23
14-9
23-18
9-5
18-14
5-1
14-9
1-5
22-17-D
5-14
17-10
21-25
10-15
25-30
15-19
30-26
27-32
26-22
19-24!-E
20-27
32-23.
White
Wins.

A. Having "changed the guard" with the piece on 21, this piece now crowns.
B. The guard is changed with the piece on 20, and white now crowns this piece.
C. It is essential to hold the piece on 20, from this square, and not from square 19.
D. Having crowned all pieces it now time to exchange, and remove the king, although this "loses the move"!
E. Just in time, and now we see why the piece on 20 was held from 27. This exchange regains the move, and traps the king, before it can reach the double corner. 70 some moves, but easy to recall-"The Idea."
WINNING 3RD POSITION Top of Page
The gist of the matter, is not to allow Payne's draw! The move is against the winning side in this setting, and white is poised to attain Payne's draw, just as sure as red goes wrong. By placing kings on 2 and 19, the piece on 5, which has to be crowned, can be started-safely. Sound hard? Like 2nd position, once the idea is known, the moves, though lengthy, are more easily recalled. Along the way the defender must try and hold the piece on 5, and avoid exchanges. Allowing the piece to advance, or gain an exchange, is exactly what the attacker wants.


13-9
22-18
9-6-A
18-22-B
6-1-C
22-18-D
21-25
18-15--E
1-6- F
14-17-G
6-2-H
17-14
25-22-I
15-10
22-26
14-18
26-31- J
18-22-K
31-27
22-18
27-24
18-14
24-19
14-18
5-9-L
18-22
9-13
10-14
19-15
14-9
15-10
22-25
13-17
9-13
17-21
25-30-M
2-6
13-17
6-9
17-13
10-6
13-17
9-13
17-14-N
13-17
14-18
6-9
18-23
9-14
23-26
14-18
26-31
17-14
30-26
14-10
26-30
10-15
31-27
15-19
27-32
18-23
32-27
Red
Wins

A. 21-25, 14-17, 9-6?, (going back 25-21 is trunk. 25-22 would be ok) 17-21*, 25-30, 18-22, 6-10, 21-17, 10-15, (5-9 17-13 draws) 17-14, 15-19, 14-18, 19-24, 18-23, 5-9, 22-17, 30-25, 23-18, 9-13, 17-22, 25-21, 18-23, 21-17, 23-26, 17-14, 26-30, 24-19, 30-26, 19-15 forms Payne's draw.
B. 18-15, 6-2, 15-10, 21-25, 14-17, 5-9, 10-15, 25-21, 17-22, 2-6, 15-18, 6-10, 18-23, 10-15, 23-26, 15-19, 26-30, 19-23, 22-26, 23-18, 26-31, 9-13, 31-27, 13-17. Red wins.
C. Not 6-2, 14-10, 5-9, 10-6, 9-13, 6-10, 21-17, 22-18. Drawn!
D. If 14-18, 5-9, 18-23, 1-6, 23-26, 6-10, 26-30, 10-15, 30-26, 15-19, 26-30, 19-23, 22-26, 23-18, 26-31, 18-22, 31-27, 2-17, 27-31, 9-14. Red wins.
E. If 14-17, 5-9, 17-21, (18-23, 1-6, 23-18, 6-10, 18-23, 9-14, 17-13, 25-22, 13-9, 14-17 Red wins.) 9-14, 18-9, 1-5, 21-30, 5-14. Red wins.
F. 25-22?, 15-10, 22-26, 14-17, 26-23 draws by playing 17-14 and 14-17 etc. If 5-9 starts at note-F, then 17-13 draws.
G. 15-18, 6-2, 14-17, 5-9, 18-15, 25-21, 17-22, 2-6, 15-18, 6-10. Red wins.
H. 25-30?, 17-22, 5-9, 22-17, 6-2, ( 6-1, 15-10, 9-13, 17-22 draws) 17-22, 25-21, 18-14. Drawn.
I. If 2-7 14-17 then 7-2 wins, but 7-3, 15-18, 3-7, (or 3-8) 17-22, 25-21, 18-14. Drawn.
J. An improvement by R. Mar, that varies from Avery's original analysis on 5-9 here. 18-23 is correct.
K. If 18-23, 5-9, 23-18, 31-27, 18-22, 27-23, 10-6, 9-13, 6-10, 23-19, 10-14, 19-15, 14-9, 15-10 wins.
L. The key move having placed the kings on 2 and 19, holding off "Payne's Draw; 5-9, now 10-6, 9-13, 6-10, 13-17 wins. From embryo landings, the key is to remember to work the kings to 2 and 19, before starting 5-9. It is much easier to remember the idea, rather than try and memorize moves.
M. 25-22, 2-6, (21-25, 22-29, 10-14, 29-25, 14-9 wins) 13-17, 6-9, 17-13, 9-14, 13-17, 21-25 wins.
N. 17-22, 6-10 wins and is like trunk, or Note-M.

WINNING 4TH POSITION TOP OF PAGE
Let us examine the battlefield, beyond what is obvious. White is a man down. Red has the attack, but also has the "held" piece on square 21, being held by the White piece on 30. In this case the position is Red Win-BUT ONLY BECAUSE, RED HAS THE MOVE!
In these kind of man down endings, (very common) the Master players simply "man off" the pieces-THAT IS THE ACTIVE PIECES-and may disregard the 2 pieces out of play. One is held, and the other, though holding, is also held-by circumstance. Id you "mask the dead duck on 21", or simply pretend it is not even on the board, and make your count with the "Active" pieces, we find we have equal pieces, and can do the move count in the normal fashion.
With Red to play, we look from square 4, at the top right, and continue counting the pieces in the Red system. There is only 1. The king on 20. An "odd" number. Therefore Red has the move, and can win.
I assure you if it is "Whites turn to play" we again mask the dead piece on 21, and find, counting from the white side, 5 pieces in the white system. With white to play-"white has the move", and the game is a draw, and cannot be won. 4th position wins, "If" you have the move, and draws, otherwise. the same applies to 1st position and 2nd position.
THE DRAWING VERSION
The drawing version is quite simple. All one has to do is "twitch" the king on 31, to and fro, UNTIL THE MOMENT OF TRUTH.
*Go 31-27, 22-18, 27-31, 23-19, 31-27, 19-24, 27-31, 18-23, and 31-26*, and the attackers cannot make any headway, NOR FORCE AN EXCHANGE. Drawn.

THE WINNING VERSION
The winning version is quite neat, remembering that forcing trades, or the reduction of pieces is necessary. Go 22-18, 31-27, 23-19, 27-31, 19-24, 32-27, (31-26, 24-28 same. Or 32-28, 24-27 gets the exchange) 24-28, 27-32, 18-22, 31-27 and the key 22-26, 30-23, 28-24 wins. An elegant "indirect" trade! Red Wins.
LET US RESET THIS.
Top of Page
We have re-set the position before the kings came attacking. Right now the outcome of this position can be determined. See the diagram on the right, and calculate "the move," masking the piece on 21. With Red to play there are 2 pieces in the Red system. The king on 3, and the king on 1. An "even" number, and white has the move. The game and the position cannot be won! This badly confuses the computer programs, who "think" with the material advantage, PLUS the king advantage, that all the ingredients are there to surely be a win. They fail to understand-"who has the move", and to further understand that in 4th position the game is a win, with the move, and a draw without it. When the attackers in this diagram, arrive at the above diagram, it will be the drawing version! Seasoned players can tell this at a glance, and so can you. Just ask: "Who has the move."??-- and do a little arithmetic.

Knowledge of "The Move", and 4th position, brings to mind a couple of games that were played, by 2 of the greatest players of all time. Both had the opportunity to draw by doing a little arithmetic, and sacrificing a man! In both cases the "move" would have been correct for the 4th position draws.
WHEN CHAMPIONS FAIL. Top of page

* The Great Newell W. Banks, once reached this position against his arch rival, Alfred Jordan. Two of the greatest of their time, and World champions, both. From the diagram on the right, Banks played 27-32, and Jordan took 22-26, 20-27, 26-10.
With white to play, and NOW unequal pieces, who has the move? (masking the dead piece on 21) Not Banks and he lost the game. What should he have played? Go 15-18*, 22-15, 27-31*, 24-28, 23-19*, 15-24, 20-27. Now who has the move?
White can slide back into the 4th position draw.


* The immortal Sam Gonotsky once agreed to play the weak side of a controversial line, to see if a draw could be found. His opponent was the renowned, John Bradford. They reached the position on the left, with Gonotsky deciding on the multiple king ending. Gonotsky played 19-24, 26-31*, 24-20, 6-10, 20-16, 31-26, 16-20, 26-22, 20-24, 10-15, 24-20, 15-18, 20-16, 21-25!*, 30-21, 23-26, 32-27, 26-31, 27-24, 31-27, 24-19, 18-23, 19-15, etc.

Gonotsky saw that materially, he would be on even terms, getting the desired kings. But "positionally", the ending loses, and he did lose.
What should he have played?
Instead of his 19-24?, there is 19-15*, 6-9, 15-18*!, (forcing the man down game!) 26-31, 18-27, 31-24, 29-25, 24- 19, 25-22, and the White King slides back into the 4th position family, (See the Payne double corner draw, below, also.) with the move correct for the draw, after 25-22, 19-15, 22-26*, 15-18, 26-31, 9-14, 31-27, 14-17, 27-24, (White draws by controlling the 31 to 20 diagonal) 17-22, 24-27, 22-25, 27-24, 25-29, 24-27, 29-25, 27-24, 18-15, (nothing better) 24-27, 25-22, and we have reached Diagram 8, Page-42, in Boland's Masterpieces. (C.R.) White can draw with 27-23, or 27-24, or 27-31. Most instructive ! Admittedly, this is difficult play, but we want to show how these positions can and do arise in play, and even the best can overlook the necessary combinations.